Mental Capacity Act
Mental Capacity Act

Mental Capacity Act
Course Summary
The Mental Capacity Act (2005) operates on the principle that individuals who are unable to make decisions for themselves, or who lack the capacity to be held responsible for their actions, should be protected by law. If, despite a carer's best attempts to assist someone in making a decision, it is concluded that a decision should be made on the individual's behalf, it is imperative that such a decision is made with that person's best interests at heart. Carers can use a Code of Practice to determine how best to ensure decisions are made in an individual's best interest within a care environment.

This learning plan aims to provide an understanding of the term 'mental capacity', how it is assessed as well as outlining the principles of the Mental Capacity Act and how it applies to carers.
Course Description
Audience
Carers, court-appointed deputies, advocates, guardians and independent mental health advocates who may be responsible for making decisions on another individual's behalf.

Introducing the Mental Capacity Act (Mental Capacity Act- Course 1)
The Mental Capacity Act (2005) operates on the principle that individuals who are unable to make decisions for themselves, or who lack the capacity to be held responsible for their actions, should be protected by law. If, despite a carer's best attempts to assist someone in making a decision, it is concluded that a decision should be made on the individual's behalf, it is imperative that such a decision is made with that person's best interests at heart. Carers can use a Code of Practice to determine how best to ensure decisions are made in an individual's best interest within a care environment.

This course aims to provide an understanding of the term 'mental capacity', how it is assessed as well as outlining the principles of the Mental Capacity Act and how it applies to carers.

Goals To provide an understanding of the term 'mental capacity', how this capacity is assessed and how the principles of the Mental Capacity Act applies to carers.


Helping with Decision Making (Mental Capacity Act- Course 2)
The Mental Capacity Act (2005) has provided healthcare professionals and legal entities with guidelines and regulations around helping individuals with their decision making. It's imperative that individuals are guided to make the best possible decision that's aligned with their best interests. Advanced decision making is also discussed at length. Independent Mental Capacity Advocates (IMCA) often help people who don't have friends or relatives to make decisions. Legal aids such as Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA) and Enduring Power of Attorney (EPA) are also discussed.

Goals To outline how to make a decision in an individual's best interests, understand what an advanced decision is, understand the duties of an IMCA, and know the meaning of LPA and EPA.


Safeguards (Mental Capacity Act- Course 3)
Understanding the various safeguards put into place through the Mental Capacity Act allows for increased clarity regarding laws and procedures designed to protect incapacitated individuals. The protection of an incapacitated person is achieved by ensuring that all relevant parties in the guardianship of the individual are involved and relevant laws and responsibilities are responsibly enforced. This course examines the law and guardianship governing safeguards and details exact standards in such involving areas as age, confidentiality, the use of restraint, involvement in research, and disagreements or disputes which need to be resolved.

Goals To increase awareness of the rules and laws involved in the implementation of Mental Capacity Act safeguards and the delegation of guardianship and legal responsibilities.
 £30.00 
+ VAT
 
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